Production


Electricity production
January – September

RWE Power1

 

RWE Innogy

 

RWE npower

 

RWE Group2

Billion kWh

2009

2008

 

2009

2008

 

2009

2008

 

2009

2008

1

Including electricity procured from power plants not owned by RWE that we can deploy at our discretion on the basis of long-term agreements. In the first three quarters of 2009, it amounted to 12.0 billion kWh, of which 10.5 billion kWh was generated from hard coal.

2

Including generation capacity and electricity purchases of RWE Energy’s regional companies.

3

RWE npower largely purchases electricity via RWE Supply & Trading.

In-house generation

108.3

135.8

 

3.0

2.9

 

18.4

27.1

 

131.9

168.2

Lignite

52.5

55.1

 

 

 

52.5

55.1

Nuclear

25.1

37.1

 

 

 

25.1

37.1

Hard coal

21.6

33.1

 

 

7.2

11.9

 

29.4

45.7

Gas

7.3

8.5

 

0.1

0.1

 

11.0

14.9

 

19.3

24.5

Renewable energies

0.5

0.5

 

2.9

2.8

 

 

4.1

4.0

Pumped storage, oil, other

1.3

1.5

 

 

0.2

0.3

 

1.5

1.8

Electricity purchased from third parties

 

0.1

0.2

 

19.53

12.93

 

87.8

80.0

Total

108.3

135.8

 

3.1

3.1

 

37.9

40.0

 

219.7

248.2

Electricity generation much lower

In the first three quarters of 2009, the RWE Group produced 131.9 billion kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity, 22 % less than in the same period in 2008. In-house generation and power purchases totalled 219.7 billion kWh. This was 11 % lower year on year.

RWE Power contributed 108.3 billion kWh to the RWE Group’s total in-house electricity production. This includes electricity generated from power plants not owned by RWE that we can deploy at our discretion on the basis of long-term agreements. RWE Power generated 20 % less electricity than in the first nine months of 2008. This was partially due to the outage of the Biblis nuclear power station for maintenance purposes. Block B has been offline since the end of January 2009, and Block A since the end of February. In contrast, the power plant had been available almost continuously in the same period last year. Excluding the Biblis effect, electricity generation was down 12 %, largely because less use was made of our contractually secured hard coal generation capacity. This is because, due to the lower prices on the spot market, we met part of our supply obligations from RWE Supply & Trading’s forward contracts through purchases from third parties at lower cost instead of via our own production.

RWE Innogy, the division specialising in renewable energy, generated 3.0 billion kWh in the period under review. Although the utilisation of our run-of-river power stations was down on the prior years high level for weather-related reasons, electricity production was up 3 %. This is a result of the company’s growth strategy. As of September 30, 2009, RWE Innogy had an installed capacity of 1.4 gigawatts (GW) at its disposal. This is 0.2 GW more than a year ago. By 2012, 4.5 GW should be in operation or under construction.

RWE npower’s electricity production dropped by 32 % to 18.4 billion kWh. As stated in Electricity prices in the UK and in Central Eastern European markets, the market conditions for hard coal and gas-fired power stations have deteriorated considerably in the UK. This is a result of the cyclically-induced decrease in demand for electricity and the UKs nuclear power plants’ much improved availability.

RWE Energy generated 2.2 billion kWh of power (first three quarters of 2008: 2.4 billion kWh). This output is largely allocable to our German regional companies. It mainly consists of gas, hard coal and hydro power generation.

Gas production down, oil production matches prior-year level

In the period under review, our upstream company RWE Dea produced 2,185 million cubic metres of gas and 1,802 thousand cubic metres of oil. In terms of oil equivalent, total output amounted to 3,917 thousand cubic metres (24.6 million barrels), which was 7 % less than the amount produced in the first three quarters of 2008 (26.4 million barrels). Gas output was down 11 %. A significant drop was recorded in the UK North Sea. We experienced a natural decrease in that region, as reserves are being depleted. In Egypt, gas production was also lower, whereas it increased in Norway. Crude oil output was essentially flat. There were natural declines in production here as well, mainly in our German and Danish fields. Volume increases in Norway had a counteracting effect.